Best Stop Loss Strategies for Forex Trading - Forex Peace Army

Is this the biggest shift in trading technology since the internet? - Andrew Baxter

Over my years in the broking industry – coming up for almost two decades soon, much has changed. The move from full service phone broking to online was one of the biggest. Self directed trading with orders executed online, seemed the way forward especially with the lower fees. However, anyone who has been down that path understands a few issues.

There are plenty more, as I am sure you know!

Advisory Service

Then of course there is the outsourcing of some of the “heavy lifting”. Perhaps you subscribe to an advisory service, newsletter or signal provider. Part of the work is done – the research and the trade ideas. However, some only provide entry, not exits – arguably the most important part. Then there is the hassle of trying to place the exact same trade – maybe too late or maybe hard to place – have a crack at placing a butterfly! What if you are busy and miss the email or report?
If any of the above resonates with you – well you are going to love the new Trade Me App.

Trade Me App

The new App enables you to do it all instantly, easily and with all the information you need in one place. The Trade Me App bridges the gap between trade recommendations or advisory services and your trading account. Through EasyTrade® you are now able to take the trade recommendations, while on the go, through 3 easy steps.

Expert Recommendations at your fingertips

With EasyTrade®, all the hard work is outsourced. Our analysts have done the heavy lifting identifying the entry, exit and stop levels, for every trade.
All the information that you need to make an effective and informed decision is provided for you. For example, you can watch a video showing our live analysis, directly from the Trading floor, or alternatively, check out the chart and trade levels. The app provides all the information in a very clear and simple format.

You keep 100% of the control

Our Expert recommendations give you the option to select which trade you would like to trade. Even though we’ve done all the work, you have 100% of the control. You can filter by strategy and for every trade you wish to take, you simply select the position size that suits you and the job is done!

Not missing opportunities

Unlike typical investment newsletters and advisory services, which rely on you reading an email, logging into a Website or taking a call, none of which may be that convenient, Trade Me brings a breath of fresh air.
The Trade Me app delivers all the information you need, instantly, to make the decision and actually take the trade there and then – no fuss, no having to log onto your trading platform and no phone call to make.

No distractions from trades that aren’t for you

What’s more, because you can chose the strategies you are most interested in, Trade Me will only notify you of the trades you are interested in, helping you save time and maintain your focus.

The death of the Trading Platform

Learning how to use trading platforms can be time consuming, is often frustrating and is almost certainly something you have had to do more than once.
Trade Me brings the power and convenience of EasyTrade® removing the risks, time and effort that come with trying to place the trade yourself, on a trading platform.

Our Simple 3 Step Solution

When you want to take the trade, simply click the EasyTrade® button
Step 1: Select the Trade Recommendation you want to take
Step 2: Choose the position size that suits you and your account
Step 3: Select the trading account (if you have more than one) you would like the trade allocated to
Then all you need to do is review your order before you submit it.

Fully Managed Orders that save you time

Then our fully authorised traders will do the rest for you. Your order will be placed and the position fully managed as per the EasyTrade® outline and your custom risk level.
Profits will be taken and the stop/loss maintained at the defined levels, letting you get on with your day, with the peace of mind that comes from knowing you have professional support looking after your money.

Our Trading Strategies

Our Recommendations, advice and trade ideas currently cover Options Trading on the ASX (Australian Securities Exchange) and across the US Markets, as well as commodity futures and Forex. If you are interested in the Stock and Share Market we can also provide you with investment education.
submitted by andrew_baxter to u/andrew_baxter [link] [comments]

I am a professional Day Trader working for a Prop Fund, Hope I can help people out and answer some questions

Howdy all, I work professionally for a proprietary trading fund, and have worked for quite a few in my time, hope I can offer some insights on trading etc you guys might have.
Bonus for you guys
Here are the columns in my trading journal and various explanations where appropriate:
Trade Number – Simply is this the first trade of the year? The 10th?, The 50th? I count a trade
that you opened and closed just one trade number. For example if you buy EUUSD today and
sell it 50 pips later in the day and close out the trade, then that is just one trade for recording
purposes. I do not create a second trade number to describe the exit. Both the entry and exit are
under the same trade number.


Ticket Number – This is ticket number / order ID number that your broker gives you for the trade
on your platform.


Day of the Week – This would be simply the day of the week the trade was initiated


Financial Instrument / Currency Pair – Whatever Financial Instrument or currency pair you are
trading. If you are trading EUUSD, put EUUSD. If you are trading the EuroFX futures
contract, then put in Euro FX. If you are trading the emini S&P, then put in Emini S&P 500. If
you are trading a stock, put in the ticker symbol. Etc.


Buy/Sell or Long/Short – Did you buy or sell to open the new trade? If you bought something to
open the trade, then write in either BUY or LONG. If you sold(shorted) something to open a
trade, then write in SOLD, or SHORT. This is a personal preference. Some people like to put in
their journals as BUY/SELL. Other people like to write in Long/Short. My preference is for
writing in long/short, since that is the more professional way to say it. I like to use the lingo
where possible.


Order Type – Market or Limit – When you entered the trade was it a market order or limit order?
Some people can enter a trade using a combination of market and limit orders. If you enter a
trade for $1 million half of which was market order and the other half was limit order, then you
can write in $500,000 Market, $500,000 Limit as a bullet points.


Position Size / Units / Contracts / Shares – How big was the total trade you entered? If you
bought 1 standard lot of a currency pair, then write in $100,000 or 1 standard lot. If you bought 5
gold futures contracts, then write in 5 contracts. If you bought 1,000 shares of stock, then write
in 1,000 shares. Etc.


Entry Price – The entry price you received entering your opening position. If you entered at
multiple prices, then you can either write in all the different fills you got, or specify the average
price received.


Entry Date – Date that you entered the position. For example January 23, 2012. Or you can
write in 1/23/12

.
Entry Time – Time that you opened the position. If it is multiple positions, then you can specify
each time for each various fill, or you can specify the time range. For example if you got
$100,000 worth of EUUSD filled at 3:00 AM EST, and another $100,000 filled at 3:05 and
another $100,000 filled at 3:25, then you can write all those in, or you can specify a range of 3:00
– 3:30 AM EST.


Entry Spread Cost (in pips) – This is optional if you want to keep track of your spread cost in
pips. If you executed a market order, how many pips did you pay in spread.


Entry Spread Cost (in dollars) – This is optional if you want to keep track of your spread cost in
dollars. If you executed a market order, how many dollars did you pay in spread.


Stop Loss Size – How big is your stop loss size? If you are trading a currency pair, then you
write in the pips. If you are trading the S&P futures contract, then write in the number of points.
If you are trading a stock, then write in how many cents or dollars your stop is away from your
entry price.


% Risk – If you were to get stopped out of the trade, how much % loss of your equity is that?
This is where you input your risk per trade expressed in % terms if you use such a position sizing
method. If you risked 0.50% of your account on the trade, then put in 0.50%


Risk in dollars – If you were to get stopped out of the trade, how much loss in dollars is that. For
example if you have a $100,000 account and you risked 1% on a trade, then write in $1,000
dollars


Potential Reward: Risk Ratio – This is a column that I only sometimes fill in. You write in what
the potential reward risk ratio of the trade is. If you are trading using a 100 pip stop and you
expect that the market can reasonably move 300 pips, then you can write in 3:1. Of course this is
an interesting column because you can look at it after the trade is finished and see how close you
were or how far removed from reality your initial projections were.


Potential Win Rate – This is another column that I only sometimes fill in. You write in what you
believe the potential win rate of this trade is. If you were to place this trade 10 times in a row,
how many times do you think you would win? I write it in as percentage terms. If you believe
the trade has a 50% chance to win, then write in 50%.


Type of Inefficiency – This is where you write in what type of inefficiency you are looking to
capture. I use the word inefficiency here. I believe it is important to think of trading setups as
inefficiencies. If you think in terms of inefficiencies, then you will think in terms of the market
being mispriced, then you will think about the reasons why the market is mispriced and why such
market expectations for example are out of alignment with reality. In this category I could write
in different types of trades such as fading the stops, different types of news trades, expecting
stops to get tripped, betting on sentiment intensifying, betting on sentiment reversing, etc. I do
not write in all the reasons why I took the trade in this column. I do that in another column. This
column is just to broadly define what type of inefficiency you are looking to capture.


Chart Time Frame – I do not use this since all my order flow based trades have nothing to do
with what chart time frame I look at. However, if you are a chartist or price action trader, then
you may want to include what chart time frame you found whatever pattern you were looking at.


Exit Price – When you exit your trade, you enter the price you received here.


Exit Date – The date you exited your trade.


Exit Time – The time you exited your trade.


Trade Duration – In hours, minutes, days or weeks. If the trade lasts less than an hour, I will
usually write in the duration in minutes. Anything in between 1 and 48 hours, I write in the hours
amount. Anything past that and I write it as days or weeks as appropriate, etc.
Pips the trade went against you before turning into a winner – If you have a trade that suffered a
draw down, but did not stop you out and eventually was a winner, then you write it how many
pips the trade went against you before it turned into a profitable trade. The reason you have this
column is to compare it to your stop loss size and see any patterns that emerge. If you notice that
a lot of your winning trades suffer a big draw down and get near your stop loss points but turn out
to be a profitable trade, then you can further refine your entry strategy to get in a better price.


Slippage on the Exit – If you get stopped out for a loss, then you write in how many pips you
suffered as slippage, if any. For example if you are long EUUSD at 1.2500 and have your stop
loss at 1.2400 and the market drops and you get filled at 1.2398, then you would write in -2 pips
slippage. In other words you lost 2 pips as slippage. This is important for a few different
reasons. Firstly, you want to see if the places you put your stop at suffer from slippage. If they
do, perhaps you can get better stop loss placement, or use it as useful information to find new
inefficiencies. Secondly, you want to see how much slippage your broker is giving you. If you
are trading the same system with different brokers, then you can record the slippage from each
one and see which has the lowest slippage so you can choose them.


Profit/Loss -You write in the profit and/or loss in pips, cents, points, etc as appropriate. If you
bought EUUSD at 1.2500 and sell it at 1.2550, you made 50 pips, so write in +50 pips. If you
bought a stock at $50 and you sell it at $60, then write in +$10. If you buy the S&P futures at
1,250 and sell them at 1,275, then write in +25 points. If you buy the GBP/USD at 1.5000 and
you sell it at 1.4900, then write in -100 pips. Etc. I color code the box background to green for
profit and red for loss.


Profit/Loss In Dollars – You write the profit and/or loss in dollars (or euros, or jpy, etc whatever
currency your account is denominated in). If you are long $100,000 of EUUSD at 1.2500 and
sell it at 1.2600, then write in +$1,000. If you are short $100,000 GBP/USD at 1.5900 and it
rises to 1.6000 and you cover, then write in -$1,000. I color code the box background to green
for profit and red for loss.


Profit/Loss as % of your account – Write in the profit and/or loss as % of your account. If a trade
made you 2% of your account, then write in +2%. If a trade lost 0.50%, then write in -0.50%. I
color code the box background to green for profit and red for loss.


Reward:Risk Ratio or R multiple: If the trade is a profit, then write in how many times your risk
did it pay off. If you risked 0.50% and you made 1.00%, then write in +2R or 2:1 or 2.0. If you
risked 0.50% and a trade only makes 0.10%, then write in +0.20R or 0.2:1 or 0.2. If a trade went
for a loss that is equal to or less than what you risked, then I do not write in anything. If the loss
is greater than the amount you risked, then I do write it in this column. For example lets say you
risk 0.50% on a stock, but overnight the market gaps and you lose 1.50% on a trade, then I would
write it in as a -3R.


What Type of trading loss if the trade lost money? – This is where I describe in very general
terms a trade if it lost money. For example, if I lost money on a trade and the reason was because
I was buying in a market that was making fresh lows, but after I bought the market kept on going
lower, then I would write in: “trying to pick a bottom.” If I tried shorting into a rising uptrend
and I take a loss, then I describe it as “trying to pick a top.” If I am buying in an uptrend and buy
on a retracement, but the market makes a deeper retracement or trend change, then I write in
“tried to buy a ret.” And so on and so forth. In very general terms I describe it. The various
ways I use are:
• Trying to pick a bottom
• Trying to pick a top
• Shorting a bottom
• Buying a top
• Shorting a ret and failed
• Wrongly predicted news
• Bought a ret and failed
• Fade a resistance level
• Buy a support level
• Tried to buy a breakout higher
• Tried to short a breakout lower
I find this category very interesting and important because when performing trade journal
analysis, you can notice trends when you have winners or losing trades. For example if I notice a
string of losing trades and I notice that all of them occur in the same market, and all of them have
as a reason: “tried to pick a bottom”, then I know I was dumb for trying to pick a bottom five
times in a row. I was fighting the macro order flow and it was dumb. Or if I notice a string of
losers and see that I tried to buy a breakout and it failed five times in a row, but notice that the
market continued to go higher after I was stopped out, then I realize that I was correct in the
move, but I just applied the wrong entry strategy. I should have bought a retracement, instead of
trying to buy a fresh breakout.


That Day’s Weaknesses (If any) – This is where I write in if there were any weaknesses or
distractions on the day I placed the trade. For example if you are dead tired and place a trade,
then write in that you were very tired. Or if you place a trade when there were five people
coming and out of your trading office or room in your house, then write that in. If you placed the
trade when the fire alarm was going off then write that in. Or if you place a trade without having
done your daily habits, then write that in. Etc. Whatever you believe was a possible weakness
that threw you off your game.


That Day’s Strengths (If any) – Here you can write in what strengths you had during the day you
placed your trade. If you had complete peace and quiet, write that in. If you completed all your
daily habits, then write that in. Etc. Whatever you believe was a possible strength during the
day.


How many Open Positions Total (including the one you just placed) – How many open trades do
you have after placing this one? If you have zero open trades and you just placed one, then the
total number of open positions would be one, so write in “1.” If you have on three open trades,
and you are placing a new current one, then the total number of open positions would be four, so
write in “4.” The reason you have this column in your trading journal is so that you can notice
trends in winning and losing streaks. Do a lot of your losing streaks happen when you have on a
lot of open positions at the same time? Do you have a winning streak when the number of open
positions is kept low? Or can you handle a lot of open positions at the same time?


Exit Spread Cost (in pips) – This is optional if you want to keep track of your spread cost in pips.
If you executed a market order, how many pips did you pay in spread.


Exit Spread Cost (in dollars) – This is optional if you want to keep track of your spread cost in
dollars. If you executed a market order, how many dollars did you pay in spread.


Total Spread Cost (in pips) – You write in the total spread cost of the entry and exit in pips.


Total Spread Cost (in dollars) – You write in the total spread cost of the entry and exit in dollars.


Commission Cost – Here you write in the total commission cost that you incurred for getting in
and out of the trade. If you have a forex broker that is commission free and only gets
compensated through the spread, then you do not need this column.


Starting Balance – The starting account balance that you had prior to the placing of the trade


Interest/swap – If you hold forex currency pairs past the rollover, then you either get interest or
need to pay out interest depending on the rollover rates. Or if you bought a stock and got a
dividend then write that in. Or if you shorted a stock and you had to pay a dividend, then write
that in.


Ending Balance – The ending balance of your account after the trade is closed after taking into
account trade P&L, commission cost, and interest/swap.


Reasons for taking the trade – Here is where you go into much more detail about why you placed
the trade. Write out your thinking. Instead of writing a paragraph or two describing my thinking
behind the trade, I condense the reasons down into bullet points. It can be anywhere from 1-10
bullet points.


What I Learned – No matter if the trade is a win or loss, write down what you believed you
learned. Again, instead of writing out a paragraph or two, I condense it down into bullet points. it
can be anywhere from 1-10 bullet points. I do this during the day the trade closed as a profit or
loss.


What I learned after Long Term reflection, several days, weeks, or months – This is the very
interesting column. This is important because after you have a winning or losing trade, you will
not always know the true reasons why it happened. You have your immediate theories and
reasons which you include in the previous column. However, there are times when after several
days, weeks, or months, you find the true reason and proper market belief about why your trade
succeeded or failed. It can take a few days or weeks or months to reach that “aha” moment. I am
not saying that I am thinking about trades I placed ten months ago. I try to forget about them and
focus on the present moment. However, there will be trades where you have these nagging
questions about they failed or succeeded and you will only discover those reasons several days,
weeks, or months later. When you discover the reasons, you write them in this column.
submitted by Fox-The-Wise to Forex [link] [comments]

Tips From A Lifer

I’ve been reading these posts on an off for quite some time now and it saddened me to see someone had recently posted their “I quit the game” statement. We all walk through fire to stand in the green valley...and the journey has to be made on foot. And alone. And it’s tough.
In response, I wanted to add a list of pointers for people starting out in this insane game and to address what I’ve learned from over a decade of trading Forex. It’s long-ish but it’s based on reality and not a bunch of meaningless retail junk systems and “insider knowledge” by nitwits on YouTube or some 19-year old “whiz kid” who apparently makes ten billion dollars a week with a mystical set-up that’ll only cost you $1,999 to buy!
I became a profitable trader by keeping everything simple. I lost thousands when I started out, but I look back now and realise how easily I could’ve avoided those losses.
Keep Everything Simple.
For the sake of disclosure, I worked for Morgan Stanley for over a decade in fixed income but learned almost everything I know from the forex guys whom I got to know as good friends. They make markets but there’s still a lot to learn from them as a small fry trader. I got into all this as a hobby after annoying the traders with questions, and all these years later it still pays me. There are still occasional nightmare accidents but they’re far rarer to the point where they don’t affect my ROI.
Possibly the most clear statement I could make about Forex trading in the large institutional setting is actually a pretty profound one: Forex traders are not what you think they are: every single forex trader I ever worked with (and who lasted the test of time) had the exact same set of personality traits: 1. NOT ONE of them was a gung-ho high-five loudmouth, 2. Every single one of them analysed their mistakes to the point of obsession, 3. They were bookish and not jocks, 4. They had the humility to admit that many early errors were the result of piss-poor planning. The loudmouths last a year and are gone.
Guys who last 5, 10, 20 years in a major finance house on the trading floor are nothing like the absurd 1980s Hollywood images you see on your tv; they’re the perfect opposite of that stereotype. The absolute best I ever met was a studious Irish-Catholic guy from Boston who was conscientious, helpful, calm, and utterly committed to one thing: learning from every single error of judgement. To quote him: “Losing teaches you far more than winning”.
Enough of that. These points are deliberately broad. Here goes:
  1. Know The Pairs. It amazes me to see countless small account traders speak as though “systems” work across all pairs. They don’t. Trading GBP/CHF is an entirely different beast to trading CHF/JPY. If you don’t know the innate properties of the CHF market or the JPY or the interplay between the AUD and NZD etc then leave them alone until you do. —There’s no rush— Don’t trade pairs until you are clear on what drives ‘commodity currencies’, or what goes on behind currencies which are easily manipulated, or currencies which simply tend to range for months on end instead of having clear trends. Every pair has its own benefits and drawbacks. Google “Tips on trading the JPY” etc etc etc and get to know the personality of these currencies. They’re just products like any other....Would you buy a Honda without knowing a single thing about the brand or its engine or its durability? So why trade a currency you know nothing about?
  2. Indicators are only telling you what you should be able to see in front of you: PRICE AND MARKET STRUCTURE. Take everything off your charts and simply ask one question: What do I see happening right here and right now? What time frame do I see it on? If you can’t spot a simple consolidation, an uptrend, or a downtrend on a quick high-versus-low time frame scan then no indicator on the planet will help you.
  3. Do you know why momentum indicators work on clear trends but are often a complete disaster on ranges? If not, why not? Do you know why such indicators are losing you tons of trades on low TFs? Do you actually understand the simple mathematics of any indicator? If the answer to these questions is “no” then why are you using these things and piling on indicator after indicator after indicator until you have some psychedelic disco on your screen that looks like an intergalactic dogfight in Star Wars? Keep it simple. Know thy indicator.
  4. Risk:Reward Addiction. The greatest profit killer. So you set up your stops and limits at 1:1.5 or whatever and say “That’s me done” only to come back and see that your limit was missed by a soul-crushing 5 pips before reversing trend to cost you $100, $200, $1000. So you say “Ah but the system is fine”. Guys...this isn’t poker; it doesn’t have to be a zero sum game. Get over your 1:1.5 addiction —The Market Does Not Owe You 50 Pips— Which leads to the next point which, frankly, is what has allowed me to make money consistently for my entire trading life...
  5. YOU WILL NEVER GO BROKE TAKING A PROFIT. So you want to take that 50-pip profit in two hours because some analyst says it’ll happen or because your trend lines say it has to happen. You set your 1:1.5 order. “I’ll check where I’m at in an hour” you say. An hour later you see you’re up 18 pips and you feel you’re owed more by now. “If I close this trade now I could be missing out on a stack”. So what?! Here’s an example: I trade in sterling. I was watching GBP climb against it’s post-GDP flop report and once I was up £157 I thought “This is going to start bouncing off resistance all morning and I don’t need the hassle of riding the rollercoaster all day long”. So I closed it, took the £157, went to make breakfast. Came back shortly afterwards and looked at the chart and saw that I could’ve made about £550 if I’d trusted myself. Do I care? Absolutely not...in fact it usually makes me laugh. So I enter another trade, make another quick £40, then another £95. Almost £300 in less than 45 mins and I’m supposed to cry over the £250 I “missed out on”?
£300 in less than an hour for doing nothing more than waiting for some volatility then tapping a keyboard. It’s almost a sin to make money that easily and I don’t “deserve” any of it. Shut off the laptop. Go out for the day.
Does the following sound familiar? “Okay I’m almost at my take-profit...almost!.....almost!....okay it’s bouncing away from me but it’ll come back. Come back, damnit!! Jesus come back to my limit! Ah for F**k’s sakes!! This is complete crap; that trade was almost done! This is rigged! This is worse than poker! This is total BS!!”
So when you were 50% or 75% toward your goal and could see the trade slipping away why wasn’t $100 or $200 enough? You need more than that?...really?!
So point 6:
  1. Tomorrow Is Another Day. Lordy Lordy, you only made $186 all day. What a disaster! Did you lose anything? Nope. Will the market be open again tomorrow? Yep. Does London open in just four hours? Yep. Is the NOK/SGD/EUR whatever still looking shitty? Yep. So let it go- there are endless THOUSANDS of trades you can make in your lifetime and you need to let a small gain be seen for what it is: ANOTHER BEAUTIFUL PROFIT.
Four or five solid but small profits in a day = One Large Profit. I don’t care how I make it, I don’t care if it’s ten lots of £20, I don’t care if I make the lot in a single trade in 30 seconds either. And once I have a nice sum I switch the computer off and leave it the Fk alone. I don’t care if Brexit is due to detonate the pound or if some Fed guy is going to crap all over the USD in his speech; I’ve made my money and I’m out for the day. There will be other speeches, other detonations.
I could get into the entire process by which I trade but it’s aggravatingly basic trend-following mostly based on fundamentals. Losing in this business really does boil down to the same appalling combination of traits that kill most traders: Greed, Impatience, Addiction. Do I trade every day? Absolutely not; if there’s nothing with higher probability trades then I just leave it alone. When I hit my target I’m out for the day- the market doesn’t give a crap about me and I don’t give a crap about the market, if you see my meaning.
I played poker semi-professionally for two years and it’s absolutely soul-destroying to be “cold decked” for a whole week. But every player has to experience it in order to lose the arrogance and the bravado; losing is fine as long as you learn from it. One day you’ll be in a position to fold pocket Kings because you’ll know you’re dead in the water. The currency markets are exactly the same in that one regard: if you learn from the past you’ll know when it’s time to get out of that stupid trade or that stupid “system” that sounded so great when you had a demo account.
Bank a profit. Keep your charts simple. Know the pairs. Be patient. Touch nothing till you understand it inside out.
And if you’re not enjoying the game....STOP PLAYING.
[if people find this helpful I might post a thread on the best books I’ve studied from and why most forex books are utterly repetitious bullshit].
Peace.
submitted by Dave-1066 to Forex [link] [comments]

Kuvera GenXT: My personal review (was a part of it for several months so trust me when I say it’s not worth it)

Initial price: $250 USD
Monthly price: $229 USD (gets waived if 3 people STAY on your team)
Compensation plan: earn $500 USD a month if you introduce 12 people, $1000 USD a month if you introduce 40 people, $2000 USD a month if you introduce 100 people. IMPORTANT NOTES:
• these people need to stay in your organization each month, if one leaves you need to recruit another- so the whole residual income (money paid to you each month no matter what) thing is a lie. • if you bring in one person and that person brings 6 others, they all count towards you. (Hence why it’s a pyramid scheme) • your tree has to be “balanced” meaning that one person can only count towards 50% of your volume. For example: if you’re aiming towards the business builder rank (12 people), and you have a star recruiter on your team, only 6 people from that star recruiters team will count towards you. So warning the residual income definitely is not as easy as it looks.
I initially joined because I really wanted to learn how to invest but I didn’t know where to start. I saw one of the bigger leaders post about the opportunity on thier ig so I decided to join. I was really sceptical at first but my “upline” sent me proof it was legit: A+ rating on BBB (which is bs) , a yahoo finance article, and the company was registered with the SEC. Something still seemed fishy but I brushed it aside (dumb idea). From that day on I was told to go to as many different “opportunity” events as possible so I learn how to pitch the idea, and get my 3 people needed for a free membership. At first I really liked it, everyone was friendly and I felt I was doing something good. However, when I started investing I realized how difficult investing was. ALL of thier trading channels that you’re supposed to “copy and paste” alerts from are complete trash. I did everything I was told (place the alert at consistent allocation, don’t be too risky etc) yet I was either losing money or breaking even each week. One week a leader will say “follow this channel it’s really good” the next week you try it it’s trash again. There was no consistency at all which is needed if you actually want to make profits with forex. Moreover the actual forex education was horrible, the kuvera videos were no help and most “traders” weren’t knowledgeable. If you want to learn from am-mature university students, be my guest and join.
The deeper I got in, the more difficult it got. I was told that I had to post everyday on social media because consistency is the key to success (or so they say). I did that for several months and although I got a few people enrolled, many dropped out eventually. I also had a difficult time recruiting because we weren’t supposed to mention the price (because it’ll scare people), and we weren’t supposed to mention kuvera since a quick google search can reveal a lot of negative things. Instead our goal was to just peak people’s interest and get them out to an event or online webinar where one of the leaders explain it in the least sketchiest way possible. Looking back, I spent a LOT of time on social media as well as the “special events” and even though I’m supposed to have more freedom since it’s not a 9-5 job, it was the complete opposite. If I missed an event my up-lines made me feel guilty and bad about skipping. My team eventually grew to many people, and I was told I had to start “being a leader” and leading by example. I was told to go to every event, host my own events, and cold market everywhere. This blew my mind because the whole reason I joined was because I wanted more time to myself, yet I felt I had less and less. I eventually got fed up because there was barely any trading training, so I slowly stopped going. And that, is when I finally got my common sense back :) . I noticed the following:
1.) a lot of the top leaders who preach that they’ve achieved financial freedom are far from the opposite. They’re either struggling with getting their first 3 people and are just faking how it “changed their life”, or they’re at either bb or exec (500-1000) a month which is barely anything compared to if you got a J.O.B.
2.) Nobody mentions their losses during their presentations. When the leader of GenXT (Matt) asks the “team” how much money they made with the system, it’s always the same people. They rotate them and mix it up every now and then but in general it’s the same pitch. If you want an idea of what the system is actually like, ask different people in the room to show you their profits from day one. Not today, not last week but their entire track record.
  1. They want you to “stay close to the fire” and attend as many events and webinars as possible so you stay brainwashed
4.) All of the team culture events (restaurants, basketball games etc) are all there to distract you from the fact that not many people are making profits.
5.) Don’t believe everything you see on social media. They may be posting lavish lifestyles but every single trip they take together (Florida, Mexico etc) was paid individually. The company does not pitch in for anything. We were actually encouraged to go on these random trips because it creates more marketing content and shows people you’re making money.
6.) I noticed a few members were using demo accounts and posting their results on ig which is very misleading. If you see people making $300+ a day and using crazy allocations, just know they either: have a lot of capital, are risking their entire account, or they’re using a demo.
7.) You need A LOT of money to invest into forex in order to make a liveable profit. Either that or you need to be highly skilled, and trust me you won’t learn anything from kuvera.
8.) All the top leaders that make money through residual or forex are literally glued to thier phones. What’s the point of joining something like this and not having a moment of peace? Why not just get a job at least you’ll have weekends in peace.
9.) They talk a lot of shit about jobs but they’re not all that bad. At least you get paid for everything you do, you could put in 100 hours to an mlm and not receive anything in return. And jobs have health benefits, sick days, and sometimes even paid vacations.
10.) If you’re a part of an mlm you’re not a “business owner”. You’re a sales representative for the company.
11.) A lot of the people involved in mlm’s are literal vultures. They’re always looking for people to recruit everywhere they go which is sad.
12.) mlm’s ARE pyramid schemes, they just hide behind a product so they can legally operate.
13.) MLM’s like kuvera sell a dream rather than a product. They claim you can be your own boss, and become financially free just because the distributers see a few big leaders living that way. There are countless webinars and training sessions that motivate you to keep going and never give up, because the people at the top depend on the people at the bottom. The whole point of creating a team culture, is to make sure that people continue to have the right “mindset”, and to make sure their people do too. Because duplication is the most effective way to create strong recruiters. And although it is possible to make lots of money if you’re good at selling, the entire mlm system is flawed. You could be making loads of money from recruits, but at the expense of potentially hurting a lot of the people you bring in. After all, if no one pays the monthly fee, the company would not be able to pay their distributers.
Some of you may be reading this and thinking I’m pretty stupid for falling for a scheme like this, and you’re right. I lost more than $1500 just from paying the monthly fees but I kept going because my uplines convinced me that it took one of the biggest leaders (rakan khalifa) a year before he made it to his rank. It took me a long time to even find the courage to quit because everyone knew I was in it. I didn’t want to make it seem like I gave up because it was embarrassing. But I’m glad I did. If you’re a part of it right now the best thing to do is walk away, but ofc the choice is up to you.
submitted by Anonyorku57 to yorku [link] [comments]

Dear Redditors, Please read to avoid my mistakes

Hi there,
Please don't be discouraged about me being a new account. I am a reader, its just in my nature to not really post anything, i tend to just lurk around. And looking at other threads/posts I know how you guys don't really take new accounts serious.
Im a 24 year old sinology bachelor, currently studying for one year in Kunming, China at the Yunnan Normal University. My story with bitcoins began like 7 years or so ago when my father showed me an article about bitcoins. quite new back then. He though it was worth getting interested in the technology but back then I didnt really have anything to invest, not did i really care that much for investment(lifes good when you have nothing but games on your mind)
I finally wanted to get into bitcoins around 4 years ago, i think it was the time when one bitcoin was around 800 dollars. I wanted to invest the money I had saved up over the years, i didnt really travel, had no real expenses just earned some money here and there in online games, especially Entropia Universe(which was kinda a virtual casino back in the good days, had a lot of luck too :)) I had just began my Chinese studies in Poland. At first my investment was a complete horror, i couldnt focus, couldnt do anything really but to check the bitcoin prices. But the price kept going up, which did make me happy, up untill 1200... when it crashed. I did panic sell as soon as I realized what had happened, did make a small loss, but looking further i did the right thing as bitcoin had crashed to 200 dollars, couldve been much worse. I had lost confidence in bitcoin, despite having read a ton about it all i really wanted was some inner peace, as it was nerve wrecking. 2 years later I once again decided to get into bitcoins, the price was at around 400 dollars, still cheaper than at what I had bought it at first. However, I used the polish exchange bitcurex. I had invested around 20000 polish zloty, which at that time was around 6600 dollars i believe. I never sent the bitcoins to a wallet because in the back of my head kept lurking the situation from 2 years before, that i might be forced to panic sell to avoid huge losses. That was a mistake the exchange shut down, along with my investment. As you can probably imagine, it took me a long time to get over the fact. I did my best to totally avoid anything bitcoin related, begged others to never mention them to me again.
I did get over it... untill it exploded. The prices After the news of Japan legalizing it just kept going up, it became ridiculous, i wanted to get back in but in the back of my head kept lurking the crash from 2014, mentally disabling me. Guess how I felt constantly calculating what i could have had, basically allowing me to live my life without any financial worries. Every day it just destroyed me. I became obsessed with the bitcoin price, hating myself for not doing anything. I didn't really save up much more since the time of the bitcurex shut down but I did have an euro savings account which my grandmother set up for an emergency. There was around 4000 euro on it, it took me a while but seeing as the price surged upwards i just figured it might be better invested in bitcoins, of course knowing that IF something happens im sure I could figure a way to get the money back. This time i chose bitmarket.pl also a polish exchange accepting euros, also easy to get into, you can transfer money into the exchange after verifying with your passport. I did of course read a lot about the exchange making sure it wont let me down like bitcurex. The fear of the crash in the back of my head got weak as i justified the price rise to japans legalization and didnt really think that a crash could happen. I was convinced it would keep going up not down. And it did go up, again I couldnt focus on absolutely anything but the bitcoin price, totally obsessed with graphs, every news and so on. After a few stressfull days, i kept getting calmer as i already was having a profit. But, the price crashed again, and again i sold, again with a loss. Well, discouraged again, i hated myself for trusting bitcoins, and i hated bitcoins, mainly because of the mass of nerve wrecking pain they gave me, feeling it everywhere, from head to toe, nerves going haywire.
Anyways, the last part, bear with me, this is where the shit hits the fan. Since the first crash after japan i took a break, again. I didnt think the stress was worth any amount of money, seriously, it destroyed me and consumed me. I did not withdraw the money from the exchange as i wanted to wait for the crash to settle and maybe buy back in. Although I was ready to withdraw right away really, i kept holding... cash :p. It didnt seem right to withdraw less than I invested. I became obsessed with graphs, with bitcoin news. Staring at the damn things for hours, checking them as soon as i remember. They were there, in the back of my head.... all the time. i figured it wasnt worth it, i knew how much it would consume me if i had money invested and I had just a few months to finally get my bachelors degree. I observed the market over the next months, hurting inside for not doing anything, but i was happy without the stress these things gave me over the years, maybe it was meant to be. But... end of october i came across the news about yet another hard fork, the mid november fork. It seemed obvious to me that the price would go up so I once again, one month ago, decided to finally just go for it again. This time using a feature of the exchange, the forex. I called all my friends and family and scraped together around 21k polish zloty. For that I bought my bitcoins at around 23.5. I used the exchange for a loan so in total i had 150k invested. It went well, thankfully, and as soon as i heard of the fork cancelling i decided to sell and be done with it. It was a success, I was happy for making some money, happy i could share with friends and family. Feeling i god damn deserved a reward for all the stress and time invested in this. Finally feeling a sense of accomplishment.
However, my current studies in China suffered majorly, again... couldnt really focus on these damn chinese characters. Its nowhere near as much as it could have been with the funds lost to bitcurex, hell i probably could also show off with a tesla right now(which i most definitely would not have, i had other plans, moving to new zealand) I was done there and then, but i kept looking at the graphs, seeing the crash, then the huge rise, then the news and this super legends prediction of 15k by the end of this year. After 10k people stopped believing in a crash, even here on the reddit forums.. I decided to go for it again, i waited a long time though, the bitcoin price was at 9800 dollars when i decided to buy in again. It hurt, considering i could have done it earlier, but i was so stressed out i needed the rest, even if it meant not making money. But the guilt of not acting got to me. Trying to make up for lost time and having imagined the possibilities what could be achieved with a bigger amount of money i invested everything i earned from the previous gains. I again set up the forex, investing a total of 300k. It didnt seem real to me that any real crash on the polish exchange could happen. By the time finex reached 10500 the polish exchange was still like 3k polish zloty behind, which did seem like a lot. It was even more for the japanese, which was over 5k ahead. It seemed like a good time to go in. So I did, this time confident, after the polish exchange price went from 35k to 39k i didnt really think it could affect my loans. Then I saw the crash happening, the huge red candle. like 4000 bitcoins sold on finex in just a minute. I saw it from minute 1, being obsessed with graphs Ive been staring at them most of the time for the past weeks, ... huge candle, still time to sell on the polish exchange... and then my VPN disconnected (Nord VPN), all i managed to sell was one forex order before the disconnect, it didnt take long for it to reconnect but it was too late, the polish exchange went nuts, absolutely nuts, the price dropped from 39k to 31k in less than 5 minutes, it was so clogged that I barely could refresh the site. What does that mean for me? Well, all my loans got cancelled, within 5 minutes, i went from almost 2 bitcoins to 0, Yeah 5 minutes was all it took for the exchange to lose 1/4 of the price HOW?? it was still at least 5k behind japan and 3k behing america WHY?? And all I really needed for the exchange was to drop 2k less, it all just seemed wrong, so wrong. The exchange is also offline as I write this.
This is a screenshot which i send to my cousin, who also is my best friend shortly before the crash asking if I should sell, http://i68.tinypic.com/28saers.png
what might sound unbelievable, his sister was giving birth, today, so he wasnt here for the crash, nor could he have given me advice, but he was there for the birth of the baby. Its all good though we wanted to put half of the earned bitcoins into an account for the new child, it was my idea too. So the day aint all that bad right? right? Maybe it was all equivalent exchange, I had to lose for it to gain, the price had to be paid? Gotta get these excuses rolling to justify what happened. Here is my conversation with my cousin, i sent him the pic of my bitcoins at basically the same time he told me his sister is giving birth. All just a few minutes before the crash. Its in polish though, if you understand it :p
Now the fun part, i felt relieved, so relieved you cant imagine, these bitcoins consumed my live for the past years, consumed my thoughts, hell i had dates i cancelled because i saw market instability... I felt relieved that there is no way back, so relieved and free from this addiction, unfortunately that feeling didnt last... In the end bitcoins kicked me in the nuts, well, maybe I did myself, maybe the panic sellers on the polish exchange did, maybe the exchange itself manipulated fools like me, hell, i dont really want to think about it anymore, i want my peace of mind, but it aint that easy, not with having lost all my money. I did have plans, but these dont matter anymore, what matters is the money I have promised to others, I do want to pay them back I just think its not fair, not considering how much time, how much stress i invested into them. This cannot be, at least for now I cant comprehend what just happened.
I hope I didnt write too much, it does help though. I just feel i needed to get this out there To all the new guys, loans on exchanges are a dangerous thing, my friend not so long ago lost a ton of money by using them betting on oil prices, should have listened, all it took him was one night to lose all his too. I guess you should listen to the majority and just HODL what you have and be happy with it, and definitely dont waste your nerves like I did, looking back now... I dont know... it seems kinda ridiculous. Oh and the baby, yep, all healthy and ugly.
If you can and believe me, feel free to, if not, good luck either way. I do not plan to continue trading like a did, i just want to lose the sense of extreme loss, its devastating. Its actually 4am here in China, started writing this because I cant really sleep, and probably wont for the night.
12A3qkh9ykjqwkvUPSY32zaERx75dzbZCG
submitted by willithesm to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Motivational Post No: 3 - Learning to Become a Successful Trader

Follow up from previous post: https://www.reddit.com/Forex/comments/5s0kamotivational_post_no_2_how_long_did_it_take_to/
Sharing another one I liked, I would pick this one as the best out of the 3 I've posted, this one is educational as well. Anyway, is the formatting alright, anything I can change to make it easier to read this wall of text? Thanks.
POST:
Learning to Become a Successful Trader
The following was posted as a comment by Ziad in reply to a post on Michael Brenke's Blog, but I'm posting it here (with Ziad's permission) because I believe it contains extremely valuable and genuine insights coming from a very disciplined and successful trader. I would also like to include the following quote by Dr.Brett Steenbarger
"Too many traders are looking for setups, when in fact they're the ones being set up."
Hi Michael,
I've been reading your blog for quite a while now but haven't commented yet. However, I feel I need to comment now.
If you don't mind I'm going to be very straight forward, and blunt even, but I hope you'll take it from a spirit of sincerity and genuine desire to help. It's going to be a long comment, so I'm going to break it up into 2 or 3 comments.
Here's the situation as I see it: For the last few months, and possibly much longer, you've just been spinning your wheels while thinking that you are getting somewhere. The reason for this is that you are going about learning how to trade in the wrong way, in my opinion. I say this because I've been trading much less than you, a little over 2 years now, and yet because of the way I went about learning and what I focused on, last year I netted $150k while nearly quintupling my account, without a single losing month, and while only risking a very small portion of my account on any single trade. Now there could be many reasons for the difference in performance, but I think one of the main reasons has to do with what you are focusing on and how you are going about the learning process.
To try to put it as succinctly as possible, in my view traders that are focusing all their attention on "set-ups" and finding out which combinations of indicators work are never going to become profitable. They are trying to follow the advice of trading books that say trading is simple and psychology is everything. So they search for set-ups that 'work', and that can take the guess work out of trading. They want to be "disciplined" and have simple rules that guide all their actions. But there's a few problems with this. Namely, while psychology is HUGE, it's not everything. And while trading is all about simple principles, actually having an edge is NOT simple. It's a myth that you can have a couple simple price or indicator set-ups and make money consistently if only you are disciplined. That's a load of crap. It keeps the dream alive for wannabe traders who never realize what it's truly about. Well let me tell you what it's truly about...
Trading is about being okay with ambiguity. It's about tolerating confusion. It's about sitting with discomfort and being at peace with it. It's about not having an exact script of when to trade or not to trade, or what's really a high odds trade, and being okay with that. It's about exceptions to the rules. It's about contradiction. It's about uncertainty.
And yet traders left and right want to make it simple. They want to reduce it to a few simple set-ups to trade with discipline. And yet the market is not simple. The market is all about uncertainty, and complexity, and ambiguity. Simple set-ups could never capture that, and they can never give you a true lasting edge.
So what's the solution? Is the problem in the simple set-ups themselves? No, it's in how they're being used. The bottom line is, every trader needs to learn to READ the markets. This means that simple rules will not do. There has to be a synthesis of different elements (whether they be price action, indicators, inter-market themes or whatever), and real-time interpretation must take place. It has to be all about CONTEXT. Once you can read the markets, and don't fool yourself it is a very complex process, then you can choose to employ "simple" set-ups to enter and exit. But the real work will be in interpreting the market to see when you should use which kind of set-up. Seeing a hammer or whatever near a support means nothing unless you've identified the broader picture and gotten a sense of the kind of tactics you should be using, and what the odds are for different scenarios unfolding.
Now I know you, and most traders do this to a certain extent, but your main focus is on the set-ups. It's not on reading the market from minute to minute, hour to hour, figuring out the odds of it doing this or doing that, adapting dynamically, and thinking of trade ideas from all your observation as the day unfolds. Rather, it's waiting for some simple set-up to pop up and then taking it.
Now is it easier emotionally to have clear set-ups to wait for and trade in this simple manner? Absolutely. But who said 'easy' would make you money. If I've learned anything, it's that the market rewards what is hard to do. It's hard to have ambiguity surrounding your market reads. It's hard being uncertain. It's hard dealing with competing and sometimes conflicting signs. And yet, this is what it's all about. You have to stop trying to avoid this by needing things to be clear cut. And is it hard to be disciplined when there's so much uncertainty about what is the right trade to make? Of course. But instead of trying to avoid the uncertainty by looking for simple set-ups, or some straight-forward method, train your mind to be able to deal with the uncertainty.
As for the learning process of how you go about doing this, it's all about being constantly engaged with the markets, trying to figure things out and learn from experience. For me, for instance, what I did was each and every day take notes in a journal all about market action and what I think it means, and how I should trade, and what is working and what's not. I didn't write a journal describing the trades I took, or what my emotions were during the day. It was all about market action. And it was all my perception and interpretation. Day after day, week after week, making mistakes, wrong calls, being clueless as to what was going on, not knowing how I should trade, not knowing if my views made sense or not, and yet I continued taking notes and learning. Then I would view charts and combinations of historical intraday charts, and I'd note certain behavior. For example, I'd study trend day after trend day and try to notice what they had in common and how I could have picked up on it in real time. Then I'd study range days. Then I'd study a price chart of the ES versus the Advance decline line and see what the relationship was across many different days. Then I'd do the same with the ES and TICK chart. And on and on. Over time, this gave me a feel for the markets, and a certain understanding of how certain days differ and many subtle signs and tells for each type of environment and context.
As for set-ups, I didn't use any predefined ones. I just formed trading ideas and then tried to get in at good trade locations. Even this, which is the art of execution, is quite complicated and not straight forward. I started realizing that in some environments it's best to wait for pullbacks, in others I need to get in at market or I'll be left in the dust. In some markets I can buy low and sell high, in other markets the opposite is in order. And so on.
I became consistently profitable in a timeframe of a few months by doing this. But of course before that I had read 30 or 40 books and so I had all the technical background. I had also worked a lot on my psychology and personal issues. But all of this was in conjunction with a method of learning and trading the markets that was mostly in opposition to what the general wisdom says about simple set-ups and exact rules.
Now of course you might say that everyone has their own style, some discretionary and some not. Absolutely. But even the purely mechanical traders are very adept at reading markets, and are aware of all of the complexity and ambiguity inherent in it. Their system might end up being simple, but it will come about through a very deep and complex understanding of markets. And usually this system will take the market environment (i.e. context) into account. It wont just be simple mindless set-ups.
In the end, all of what I am saying is meaningless unless you come to a personal realization. Take a look at your trading career thus far. Do you truly believe that if you just learn to focus and take all of your set-ups then your equity curve will reverse and you'll be a consistently profitable trader? Why would the world's top institutions spend millions and billions on R&D when a few simple set-ups could make them all of the money. This doesn't mean that to make money you need extremely complex mathematical models. Far from it. What it does mean is that you need extremely complex mental maps that take time and experience to develop, and that will never develop if you spend the whole trading day simply waiting for set-ups to materialize. That just won't cut it.
Right now your learning curve is stagnant because you're not truly studying the markets. Your day is wasted in waiting mode. It's not in observing and absorbing mode. Also, because you fear loss, you aren't willing to experiment. This means that you aren't making mistakes and failing regularly, which is what you need to do to learn quickly.
So to conclude, based on all of the above, my advice to you would be to stop trading and make a mental shift. Realize what you need to do to become successful, and it's definitely not staying on this endlessly unfruitful path being supported by the hope of future profits. You're just running in your place unless you change your focus and your learning method. And if you thought the journey was tough so far, you haven't seen anything yet. Get ready for uncertainty and ambiguity like you've never seen it before. But this shouldn't be scary. It should be exciting, because this is what trading is all about. This is why it's called an ART. And it truly becomes one when you change your focus and your learning process. Then everything, including success, becomes possible. And until then, it'll be a distant dream that keeps appearing to be so close and yet stays so far away.
So you need to re-align with a new thought system and then get on the simulator and trade. Take losses. Make mistakes. Be clueless. Don't be afraid of it. It's okay, that's the only way you'll progress. And trust me, progress you will.
Best of luck to you, and I wish you much success.
Ziad
ChuckJune 29, 2009 at 5:44 PM I re-read Ziad's post again today (and no doubt will re-read it many more > times) because it really makes me think about how I analyze the market > each day and how I fit my own setups inside a discretionary plan that has to take into account all the "reads" the market is giving, or at least how I interpret those reads. Ziad must be a brainy guy. I have described the market as being like a maze whereas we show up at the same front entrance every day, and we navigate the maze in the same way (i.e. the same timeframes and indicators every day), and we exit at the same place each day, but every day the walls of the maze are switched around so that the paths are different each day. That's how I see Ziad's premise (a correct premise I believe). We enter the maze each day with the same ability to turn right or left, but unless we see the bigger picture and learn to understand and "get a grip on it" on the bigger view mentally,the turns will lead us to dead ends. Maybe that's confusing but executing our setups without being able to interpret the bigger picture "good enough" will lead to frustration and a lot of "what the hell is going wrong?" frustration.
I'm glad you liked the post Chuck. I felt I had to write it because I know how bad I wanted to succeed at trading when I first started out and how I searched for every inkling of advice I could get. So when I have the chance to offer timely advice I always have to take that opportunity.
And since we're on the subject, I'll share a couple more things with you. Every day I psych myself up before the trading day and during it so that I can have that killer mentality needed to have peak performance in trading. One thing I read every day is something that I wrote to remind myself what trading is all about and where my focus should be. I wrote it because whenever I faced adversity and had ups and downs it always demotivated me and knocked the wind out of my sails temporarily. But I realized that to perform at a world class level I couldn't let that happen. So I wrote the following, and I read it every day at least once or twice:
"It’s not meant to be easy to do all of this; in fact it’s meant to be very hard. If it were easy anyone could do it. Almost everyone knows what it takes; few can actually do it consistently. That's the challenge. When adversity strikes even when you're doing the right things, it’s not unfortunate because greatness is not just about doing the right things, but about doing them even when they cause pain and discomfort- weathering the tough times is the inherent prerequisite for being great. Adversity is built into the game and therefore it’s not an unfortunate set-back that is keeping you from your potential; rather your potential is cut very short without being able to deal well with adversity. So expect great results long-term, but adversity and ups and downs short-term. It’s got to always be about doing the long-term beneficial, not the short-term pleasurable. And we don’t deviate from that, no matter the pressure. And we relish the opportunity to be mentally tough when adversity strikes when so many would wilt and when it feels so unnatural to be optimistic and confident. That is the real goal and priority. Now keep conditioning- constantly reprocess and replace any thoughts that aren’t in line with all of this. It will take a great commitment to unlearn old thinking patterns and instill a new way of thinking to the point of habit. And you can do it."
Reading this reminds me that I'm not a victim of circumstances. That adversity isn't some external factor sabotaging my results. It's part of the game. In fact, it's what the game is all about! You have to learn to relish the opportunity to remain poised when losses hit or when you make mistakes. Take pride in it and make it your main focus. Love trading's inherent difficulties because the ability to handle them is what will truly set you apart. And always remember: this is a game of hits, losses, and misses. Those that can take them best ARE the best.
I wish you all the best in your trading.
Ziad
Credits: http://www.eminiplayer.com/2009/06/learning-to-become-successful-trader.html
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How to Set Up a Stop Order - YouTube Truths about Stop Losses That Nobody Tells You! - YouTube How to Place a Stop Loss Order - YouTube How to Set a Stop Loss on Think or Swim - YouTube 11 How to place a guaranteed stop loss order How to Place a STOP LOSS and TAKE PROFIT when Trading Forex! TOS Tutorial: Adding A Stop Loss Order - YouTube Anleitung für den MetaTrader 4 - Wie gebe ich Stopp Loss ... 99. How to Place a Stop Loss and Take Profit Order in Forex Using a Stop Order to Enter a Trade: Buy Stop vs Sell Stop ...

This order type will sell your stock automatically when share levels drop, giving you peace of mind when you’re away from your trading platform during any significant downward action in price. This order does not put a cap on profits. Shares can continue to rise and you will stay invested as long as prices do not dip by your predetermined percentage. The trailing stop-loss order is flexible ... Stop Loss In Forex: ... which gives you more peace of mind knowing that there is a cushion to reduce the total losses of bad spells. You can also decide that, if you ever experience a drawdown much worse than the worst case of the last 10 years, you will stop operating and revisit your strategy. Once you are sure of the maximum loss you can tolerate, you must be sure of the method you use to ... Script will help manual trader to making fast execution without click open new order, there are many kinds script and depending with creator, script for pending order, or script for close all order had different function, and how to instal script, you can put file script usually has extention ex4 in script folder, with click on mt4 platform on file, then click open data folder and put file on ... Forex Market is totally unpredictable. Any unfavorable move can result in a big loss to your trading account. We can just assess the future price or trend of security. That's the reason, each trade involves a lot of risks. Money management and risk to reward ratio are critical in Forex trading. A Stop-loss order is just like an insurance policy ... A stop loss order is simply a trading risk management strategy. How To Place A Stop Loss Order. For forex traders that are just now learning about forex trading, here’s how to place a stop loss order: So if you place a buy order, then you have to place a stop loss order under the entry price of your buy order. If price moves down and your ... Therefore, a stop-loss order should be placed around an area where you’re not interested to stay in the trade if breached, allowing for an easy and fast exit out of the market. Keep in mind that in times of high market volatility, wider stop-losses should be used to account for sudden price fluctuations. Giving a trade space to breathe avoids that you get stopped out by market noise – If ... A price you enter on your trading platform to limit the maximum amount of pips you can lose on an open trade. If the price moves against you and touches your stop loss, your order should close automatically (see Stopped out).

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How to Set Up a Stop Order - YouTube

Are you looking for a specific part of the video? No need to blindly fast-forward! The video above goes over how to set up stop orders on all three platforms... Join our Trading Room with a 7-day FREE trial and learn my proven forex strategies: https://bit.ly/2zTjjDb Entering the trade in the forex market is as simpl... Is utilizing stop loss orders for the average trader a good or bad idea? Andre Minassian, self-employed medium-term trader and businessman comments. Why are s... Sometimes a standard stop-loss just won’t cut the mustard, particularly when markets are volatile. So, a guaranteed stop-loss can be a real money-saver and bring you peace of mind. Here we show ... FREE trial at TackleTrading.com here: https://tackletrading.com/pro-member-youtube/ This video shows you how to add a Stop Loss to an existing position in Th... Stop Order to Enter a Trade? Buy Stop vs Sell Stop http://www.financial-spread-betting.com/course/technical-analysis.html Check Mark's Premium Course: ht... Practice placing orders with a demo trading account: http://bit.ly/IT-forex-demo3 A lesson on how to place a stop loss and take profit order in the forex mar... Get FREE Stock Market Basics Training: https://cutt.ly/ufInC9r Watch this video to fully understand how to set a stop loss on the Think or Swim trading platf... JETZT CFD´s & FOREX TRADEN: http://bit.ly/brokertipp GRATIS DEMO-KONTO: http://bit.ly/demotrade Deutsche Bedienungsanleitung für den MetaTrader 4. Erfahr... How to Place a Stop Loss Order http://blog.theoptionstradingcourse.com for more option trading training. If you have questions, either leave them in the comm...

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